3 New Trick-or Treats: “Nevermore,” “Fallen Saints” and “Dracula”

In less time than it takes a millennial to finish high school, Halloween has grown into the City of Angels’ second-largest theatre season (after the summer Hollywood Fringe Festival).

But it’s not about angels. Fall’s luxuriant growth is full of haunts, escape rooms and mystery tales, all done with black ink, charcoal, and the bright burst of fresh blood.

Here are just three of this year’s new offerings for fright fans:

“NEVERMORE” — A Playful, Twisty Poe Mystery

Elise Golgowski, Michael Lutheran

Elise Golgowski, Michael Lutheran

Theatre Unleashed in NoHo brings another full-length new work out of its deep wine cellar,  uncorking Matt Ritchey’s witty pastiche, Nevermore. Ritchey, director Sean Fitzgerald and the troupe play freely with Edgar Allan Poe’s poems, his stories, and his life.

The result is a tasty dark pastry laced with humor, happily free from dull historical accuracy. It is, however, very accurate to the early 19th-century America Poe inhabited. It’s also studded with Easter eggs for those who know the horror master’s tortuous bio and full bookshelf.

Michael Lutheran (Edgar) and David Foy (his old friend Montresor) shape the mystery’s twisted spine, while David Caprita (a menacing majordomo) and Elise Golgowski  (Lenore) flesh out the terror.  Poe famously said  the most poetic topic is the death of a beautiful woman; Golgowski’s enigmatic Lenore makes us believers.

Oh, and there’s a hidden egg for actors, as the redoubtable Courtney Sara Bell turns a simple “exposition character” into a brilliantly nuanced driver of the tale’s tension.

Thursdays thru Saturdays at 8:00 til Nov. 5,  at The Belfry, 11031 Camarillo St.  <www.theatreunleashed.org> or (818)849-4039. 

“FALLEN SAINTS” — Meeting with a Victorian Medium

An audience member meets a revenant (photo: Adam Neubauer)

An audience member meets a revenant (photo: Adam Neubauer)

The new Force of Nature Company invites us into a 19th-century funeral home at a tiny NoHo storefront.  Gradually, we realize we’re walking toward a seance, and (if we know our Victorian villains) we may suspect whose turf we’re invading.

A grimly cheerful undertaker (Wyn Harris) welcomes us to the compact tour, where a blinded musician (Anatol Felsen) screeches a coffinside serenade and an unhinged scientist (Gloria Galvan) shows off her grisly gathered gifts.  Hectored along by a biblical prophet, we enter the presence of an elegant spiritualist (Michelle Danyn); she’s inhabited by a succession of wraiths from beyond, who all point to a mystery.  Then — suddenly– it is resolved.

This is not a leap-out-at-you chamber of horrors, but a more low-keyed exploration that pleases your fancy and teases your mind, even if you’re not a period geek.  Performances are focused and strong (especially the mercurial Galvan and the commanding yet vulnerable Danyn); the tour is a bit brief, and its tension could be heightened.  But Fallen Saints promises to become a worthy addition to the city’s fall fear fest, and a gentle introduction for newbies.

Fridays and Saturday (5 shows between 7:00 and 10:00) thru Oct. 29, at The Actors Group, 2813 W. Magnolia Blvd. <www.fonproductions.com> .

“DRACULA” — Fresh Telling of a Familiar Tale

April Morrow, Paul Romero (photo: Shane Tometich)

April Morrow, Paul Romero (photo: Shane Tometich)

The Count arose to life 120 years ago in Bram Stoker’s novel,
and the classic film (with Bela Lugosi)  is 85 years old. But the Loft Ensemble’s new,  streamlined version is well worth seeing.

In adapting  Dracula: Blood Before Dawn, Raymond Donahey has compressed Stoker’s sprawling classic into a swift tale of love, lust and conflict. The loves are a lesbian romance — Mina (Ainsley Peace) and the ill-fated Lucy (Lauren Sperling) — and an intense Platonic bond that grows between Mina and Dr. Seward (Paul Romero). The lusts are what drive the two antagonists  — Van Helsing (Marz Richards), who’s passionate for life, and Dracula (Matt Gorkis), who’s addicted to power and death.

Though Donahey preserves the chase drama at the story’s core, it is not Van Helsing but Mina who confronts Dracula at the climax.  She’ll let him take her into eternal half-death if they will use their immortal powers for enhancing life; he, seeing no value in life, insists she help him spread suffering and death. She loses this existential duel, but Van Helsing — affirming both life and death — overpowers the vampire and destroys him.

Dracula: Blood Before Dawn deals more openly with sexual and gender issues than the Victorian original; its characters’ lively interest in Darwin, Freud and Neitzsche also make it more intellectually satisfying.  The set design, by Mitch Rosander and Bree Pavey, is broodingly atmospheric (yet marvelously clever). The performances range from adequate to excellent, with Gorkis’ open, quiet elegance and hidden despair; Richards’ self-irony and rousing arias; and April Morrow’s perfectly embodied Mary (Donahey’s version of the insane acolyte Renfield) taking the palms.

The Loft Ensemble has created a work that deserves a permanent place in the lore of the Transylvanian count; it should resonate fully and long with 21-century audiences.  This debut production is strong, and — with directorial attention to a few performance details (some of which may smooth out now that opening night is past) — on the way to being uniformly excellent.

Fridays and Saturdays at 8:00, Sundays at 7:00, thru Nov. 13, at 13442 Ventura Blvd.,Sherman Oaks.  <loftensemble.secure.force.com/ticket> .