Mitu’s “Juarez”: A City Between Hell and Home

If you don’t know Theater Mitu, you should. They’re a New York company that works the space between — between cultures, between ancient and modern, between heaven and earth.

In Juárez: A Documentary Mythology, now at L.A. Theatre Center, they take us between hell and home — to a city caught between Mexico and the US, between local farming and global industrialization, between battling drug cartels and folks who just want to live.

And Mitu’s method of telling this story lives in a middle ground — somewhere between live theatre and electronic journalism. There’s no set, few costumes; instead, the stage is filled with screens, mic stands, speakers, wires. Half of the text is drawn from the troupe’s research (the Documentary of the title); the rest is woven from their interviews with the people of Juárez (the Mythology). Instead of enacting events and characters, the actors  take turns reading out facts, and transmitting the citizens’ words.

(photo: Kayla Asbell)

(photo: Kayla Asbell)

Still, the result is undeniably theatrical. We don’t learn anyone’s name (“Teacher, 43,” “Grandmother, 80”), but their words — and home movies of director Rubén Polendo’s family — take us into their city and its life. We feel nostalgia for quinceañeras and cotton fields, sudden confusion as maquila factories outsourced by US firms explode the small city into miles of stranger-filled shantytowns, and terror as angry youths randomly murder young girls and heavily armed drug gangs slaughter one another in the streets.

Juárez takes us to a place of terrible despair. We learn what it is to be trapped in hell, and powerless. Juárez’s last few years offer a slender hope; things seem to be improving, though no one knows why. It’s a tendril of green pushing up through concrete, but we cling to it.

Because this has become our city. Of course, safe in our seats, we know we’ve only learned of the tribulations of Juárez — we haven’t lived them. But we know we will. We, too, will face disruption and chaos, as late-stage capitalism keeps spreading around the globe and our damaged ecosystems struggle to re-balance themselves.

Juárez: A Documentary Mythology never voices these warnings. It doesn’t have to. Unusual as it is, Theater Mitu’s vivid story-telling engrosses us in the experience of other human beings, and lets us take from it whatever we can.

In an ensemble effort so seamless that no one can be singled out, the Mitu troupe creates a rare and powerful experience. Their Juarez proves that even without sets, costumes or characters, theatre can move us and challenge us deeply.
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Juárez: A Documentary Mythology, a Theater Mitu collaboration, conceived and directed by Rubén Polendo.
Presented by the Latino Theater Company, at LA Theatre Centre, 514 S. Spring St., LA 90013.

Thursdays through Saturdays at 8:00,
Sundays at 3:00,
through November 13.

Tickets: <www.thelatc.org> or (213) 489-0994.